Summer Camps!

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These camps for the youngest emerging filmmakers are the highlight of our summer. Take a gander at these new offerings, just posted on our website!

Summer Camps for Youth

NWFF Summer camps are two week long camps for 11-14 year olds and 14-17 year olds!  Contact the Studio Director to find out more about the camps (dave at nwfilmforum.org).  Please sign up for our Family Frames emails to be the loop for NWFF youth camps and screenings.

Full and partial scholarships are available for both classes. Contact the Studio Director for more information.

Mixed Animation Camp

Two Weeks, Monday–Friday, Aug 2–13, 9am–3pm
Instructor: Britta Johnson
Tuition: $500
Max Attendance: 10
Recommended for ages 14-17
Are you a first-time animator or a seasoned filmmaker looking to pick up some new tricks and skills?  Come join us for two solid weeks of animation! Classic Disney films and TV shows like Gumby were all made before computers and demonstrated a variety of hands-on animation styles that are still used today in films like Coraline. Students will learn these traditional animation techniques by working with drawings, collage, clay, puppets or objects. Each student will create his or her own short film by going through the whole process: planning a project with scripts and storyboards, using movement to give characters expression, and finishing pieces with voiceovers and sound. Finished films will be compiled on a DVD for students to take home and share.

Two Week Film Camp

Two Weeks, Monday–Friday, June 28–July 9, 9am–3pm
Instructor: Forrest Baum
Tuition: $500
Max Attendance: 10
Recommended for ages 11-14
Taking a hands-on, in-depth approach, students will spend time learning all aspects of filmmaking, from story and concept to finished product. The two-week class will begin by focusing on characters and plot, storyboarding and planning before the shoot. Students will then use professional video cameras, microphones and lighting kits to create their films. Teams will come up with multiple pieces, perfecting their craft by trying out different roles and ideas. Students can choose the method and style of filmmaking, even focusing on different variations of an idea. Their final film will be shot, edited and polished in time for a screening in NWFF’s theater on the last day of class.
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